Preparing Pets for Emergencies

The Fire Dept. is ready to help your pet in case of fire. All Fire Dept. rigs are equipped with oxygen pet masks which helped Titan the dog survive a fire in 2013.

Preparing for your pets makes sense. Get Ready Now.

If you are like millions of animal owners nationwide, your pet is an important member of your household. The likelihood that you and your animals will survive an emergency such as a fire or flood, tornado or terrorist attack depends largely on emergency planning done today. 
  
 
     
PREPARE - Get a Pet Emergency Supply Kit

  • Food - Keep at least 3 days of food in an airtight waterproof container.
  • Water - Store at least 3 days of water just for your pets in addition to water you will need for yourself and your family.
  • Medicines & Medical Records - Keep an extra supply of medicines your pet takes in a waterproof container.
  • First Aid Kit - Include cotton bandage rolls, bandage tape and scissors, antibiotic ointment, flea & tick prevention, latex gloves, isopropyl alcohol and saline solution.
  • Collar with ID tag, harness or leash - Your pet should wear a collar with its rabies tag and identification at all times. Consider permanent identification such as microchipping.
  • Crate or other pet carrier.
  • Sanitation - Include pet litter and litter box, newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags and household chlorine bleach. In an emergency, bleach can be used to purify water. Use 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water. Do not use scented or color safe bleaches or those with added cleaners.
  • A picture of you and your pet together - If you become separated from your pet during an emergency, a picture of you and your pet together will help you document ownership and allow others to assist you in identifying your pet.
PLAN - What you will do in an Emergency 
 
  • Create a plan to get away - Plan how you will assemble your pets and anticipate where you will go. If you must evacuate, take your pets with you if practical. If you go to a public shelter, keep in mind your animals may no be allowed inside. Consider family or friends willing to take in you and your pets in an emergency. Other options may include a hotel or motel that takes pets or a boarding facility, such as a kennel. 
  • Create a plan to get away - Plan how you will assemble your pets and anticipate where you will go. If you must evacuate, take your pets with you if practical. If you go to a public shelter, keep in mind your animals may no be allowed inside. Consider family or friends willing to take in you and your pets in an emergency. Other options may include a hotel or motel that takes pets or a boarding facility, such as a kennel or veterinary hospital. 
  • Develop a buddy system - Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Talk with your pet care buddy about your evacuation plans and show them where you keep your pet's emergency supply kit. 
  • Talk to your pet's veterinarian about emergency planning. 
  • Gather contact information for emergency animal treatment - Make a list of contact information and addresses of area animal control agencies and emergency veterinary hospitals. Obtain "Pets Inside" stickers and place on doors and windows including information on the number and types of pets in your home to alert firefighters and rescue workers. If time permits, write "Evacuated with Pets" across the stickers should you flee with your pets. 
The Fire Dept. has pet oxygen masks on every rig. An oxygen mask was used to help save "Titan" injured at a house fire in 2013.